Clinicians and Patients Collaborate to Educate and Inspire

No one can ever truly understand the feelings and emotions a person newly diagnosed with a spinal cord injury (SCI) is experiencing. Anger, confusion, sadness, shock and frustration are just a few. Coupled with those feelings are the challenges of coping with a new physical condition and the routines of care needed on a daily, sometimes hourly, basis.

According to Marni Nutkowitz, PsyD, SCI Neuropsychologist at MossRehab, the people who know best what a person with a spinal cord injury is experiencing, are others with spinal cord injuries. “As providers of service, we impart education and help individuals with SCI develop necessary life skills,” she explains. “But we can’t completely understand their emotional state, or their view of the future.”

The late David S. Loeb, Jr. knew what it meant to live with a spinal cord injury. At 19, Loeb experienced a traumatic spinal cord injury, leaving him with impairment of mobility in all four limbs. For more than 60 years, he proved that a spinal cord injury did not mean a life of limitations, but rather the beginning of a newly adapted life in which all things were possible.

Read the full article on the Einstein Healthcare website…

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