Imageworks Film & Video Wins Prestigious Award

Berks County Film and Video Company Sheds Light on Spinal Cord Injury Issues

Imageworks Film and Video was notified today that they won a Telly Award for their production entitled Managing Emotional Health after Spinal Cord Injury, a patient education video produced for Einstein Healthcare Network’s Moss Rehab as part of an informational series addressing spinal cord injury patient issues.

The piece is the result of extensive interviews with people suffering from traumatic injury to the spine and contains very candid personal commentary. It is intended to be a resource for anyone wanting to navigate the challenges of such an injury, including people who take care of the injured person.

“We consider it our good fortune to be offered work where we can shed light on complex topics that requires faith in our ability to draw out stories of a sensitive nature, “ said Lorrie King, the producer of the winning piece. “We were humbled by the strength of our subjects and their willingness to share their life stories.”

Imageworks has produced dozens of medical, medical device and pharmaceutical industry pieces which it considers an industry of focus for them. They have partnered with Moss Rehab and the Einstein Healthcare Network on this and other productions.

The Telly Awards is the premier award honoring video and television across all screens. Established in 1979, The Telly Awards receives over 12,000 entries from all 50 states and 5 continents. Entrants are judged by The Telly Awards Judging Council—an industry body of over 200 leading experts including advertising agencies, production companies, and major television networks, reflective of the multi- screen industry The Telly Awards celebrates.

Telly Award winners represent work from some of the most respected advertising agencies, television stations, production companies and publishers from around the world.

The Telly Awards are judged by members of the Telly Awards Judging Council, a group of over 200+ working industry who have previously won the Telly Awards highest accolade and as such, have demonstrable expertise in the categories they review.

Imageworks’ entry was a winner in the general-non-broadcast health and wellness category.

Imageworks Film & Video was established in 1986 and is owned and operated by Lorrie King and John Krawlzik. Their offices and studios are located in Wernersville, PA.

Video Series Teaches Spinal Cord Patients Critical Recovery Skills

Imageworks Film and Video, Inc. Produces Learning Tools for MossRehab

The statistics are frightening. More than 17,000 new spinal cord injuries occur each year. Less than 1% of persons injured will experience a complete neurological recovery by the time of hospital discharge.[1]

99% of persons with a spinal cord injury will learn a new normal when they leave the hospital, adjusting to their injuries emotionally and physically through time, physical rehabilitation, and education.
Organizations like Einstein Healthcare Network’s nationally renowned MossRehab begin the delicate journey of spinal cord injury recovery with their patients, and then dedicate themselves to supporting each patient through their entire life. Repeatedly ranked by U.S. News & World Report as the number one rehabilitation hospital in the Philadelphia region, Moss provides spinal cord injury or SCI patients with a continuum of comprehensive spinal cord care. Translation- they know a lot about SCI’s. But if you’re the one living with an SCI, you have a wealth of knowledge to share too.

Recognizing the power of clinical expertise coupled with patient experience, and with the help of financial support from a patient who had lived through the challenges of an SCI,

the MossRehab SCI team worked with PA-based Imageworks Film and Video to produce an educational video series entitled “Living with a Spinal Cord Injury”. The series provides extensive information on the day to day care required for people with an SCI, but more importantly gives new patients and their families invaluable perspectives from SCI patients themselves.

Marni Nutkowitz, PsyD, SCI Neuropsychologist at MossRehab, explains the premise, “It is often only through exposure to the experiences of others that newly injured individuals begin to realize that they are not alone,” explains Nutkowitz, “and that living a productive life after SCI is within their reach. As with any traumatic event, to be able to relate to someone who has successfully navigated their way through it, is invaluable.”

MossRehab introduced Imageworks’ producer Lorrie King to 12 SCI patients, each identified as having unique insights into several areas of physical and emotional concern common to newly injured SCI persons. “I had the privilege of getting to know each one of these patients and found all of them to be very comfortable talking about their personal physical and emotional experiences. I knew they would make powerful on-camera interviews and help us to create an engaging framework for the more clinical information we needed to cover.”

Patient interviews coupled with numerous MossRehab clinical experts resulted in 10 video segments on topics including breathing, bladder and bowel care, intimacy, and emotional health.

Released on MossRehab’s website over the next few months, they will provide a worldwide resource for SCI patients and their caregivers.
Using patients to teach other SCI patients was key to this effort, but it did have some unexpected consequences. Says Alysse, an SCI patient who appears in the videos, “The best way to help yourself is to help someone else, and it sounds cliché but until you see that you’ve made a difference in someone’s life, you don’t know how good it feels.”

Clinicians and Patients Collaborate to Educate and Inspire

No one can ever truly understand the feelings and emotions a person newly diagnosed with a spinal cord injury (SCI) is experiencing. Anger, confusion, sadness, shock and frustration are just a few. Coupled with those feelings are the challenges of coping with a new physical condition and the routines of care needed on a daily, sometimes hourly, basis.

According to Marni Nutkowitz, PsyD, SCI Neuropsychologist at MossRehab, the people who know best what a person with a spinal cord injury is experiencing, are others with spinal cord injuries. “As providers of service, we impart education and help individuals with SCI develop necessary life skills,” she explains. “But we can’t completely understand their emotional state, or their view of the future.”

The late David S. Loeb, Jr. knew what it meant to live with a spinal cord injury. At 19, Loeb experienced a traumatic spinal cord injury, leaving him with impairment of mobility in all four limbs. For more than 60 years, he proved that a spinal cord injury did not mean a life of limitations, but rather the beginning of a newly adapted life in which all things were possible.

Read the full article on the Einstein Healthcare website…